Aggressive Monitoring: Analyzing and Responding to Real-Time Classroom Data

We began the “Data Series” blog posts emphasizing the importance of daily independent practice, then explored 5 concrete steps to ensure your lessons are aligned to state standards, and most recently the 3 types of meaningful data that will help increase results in your classroom. In the latest post, the second type of data discussed was daily classroom data: data that a teacher collects during the lesson in one class period. This type often helps determine who is on track for mastering the daily objective and who needs immediate remediation. The game-changing strategy used to collect data daily is where we will end our “Data Series” posts. Educators, allow me to introduce you to Aggressive Monitoring.

2 Elements That Must Exist in Your Teaching Practice

For K-12 educators, the spring semester is PACKED with state assessments, holidays, end-of-year field trips, benchmark or interim assessments (i.e., Common Assessments, NWEA, interims, STEP/Fountas & Pinnell/DRA), spring break, unit or module assessments, mid-module assessments, spring concerts or performances, and did I mention daily or final assessments? For many of us, simply reading this list is exhausting — imagine staying organized throughout the process! Due to the sheer amount of “goings-on” in the spring, in my first couple years of teaching, I often found myself planning day-to-day, having stacks on stacks of papers sitting to grade (thus mostly trusting my gut on daily mastery instead of graded evidence), and getting to the state assessment hoping and praying my children would do well.

I have some good news!

Over the next couple of weeks, I’m going to share some best practices on MEANINGFUL data collection (what to collect, how to analyze it efficiently, making adjustments based on the data) and giving students feedback so that they own their knowledge and learning.

Top Edcite Question Types of 2018: #16-31

Throughout the month of December we counted down the top Edcite question types answered by students in 2018! If you missed our #EdciteQCountdown on Throughout the month of December we counted down the top Edcite question types answered by students in 2018! If you missed our #EdciteQCountdown on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest, you can check out our most popular question types here on the Edcite Blog. Read on for #16-31 (and check back this weekend for numbers 1-15!).

Multiple Choice Question Type

Edcite has 60 technology-enhanced question types and over 150,000 items that teachers have shared into the Question Bank. Teachers can search by standard, topic, multimedia, and type of grading. Teachers and teams can also create their own question types aligned to standards and state assessments.

The number one most popular question type on Edcite is our multiple choice question with auto-grading!

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