4 Ways to Differentiate Lessons in Inclusion Classrooms

In the midst of a lesson, an inclusion teacher (or co-teacher) is often considering two different needs for each of their students: (1) the strategies to implement so that each student reaches their Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals, and (2) the accommodations to provide so that each student accesses and comprehends the current lesson. Inclusion teachers must use a variety of approaches in order for their students to successfully achieve their individualized goals and master the daily lesson objectives. Here are 4 approaches to add to your repertoire.

My Favorite Teaching Tool: The Stack Audit

Teachers have a plethora of tools in their metaphorical toolkit, and often utilize many of those tools on an hourly basis. Some of these tools are taught in teacher education programs; however, many “tools” are acquired through experience and ongoing professional development once teachers are in the classroom.

4 Checks for Understanding You May Have Forgotten

Have you ever been grading a stack of papers and found yourself wondering, “How did my students perform so poorly? I really thought they knew this material!” I have found that moments like these can often be answered with the recognition that I did not check for understanding (CFU) enough throughout the unit or within each lesson.

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