Using Edcite for Formative Assessment

Illuminate what your students know and don't know with formative assessments!
Illuminate what your students know and still need to learn with formative assessments!

Formative assessment is a key to learning success.  When we know who needs to be challenged and who needs intervention, we are better able to decide the next steps to ensure maximum student achievement.   According to current research, assessment has the most positive impact on student learning when it is administered either in short or medium cycles.  Short cycle assessments are administered within minutes or days, whereas medium cycle are administered within 1-4 weeks. 

Gathering and analyzing the data can be daunting.  With Edcite as a base, we can effectively and efficiently document and prove each student’s success with each standard.  While we all have different approaches to formative assessment, using Edcite can simplify and streamline the process.

Pre-Testing

Giving a standard-specific assessment on Edcite can be really useful before beginning a unit or addressing a standard with direct instruction. Then, the data will be there and help tailor instruction and interventions for the whole class, small groups, and individual students.

The My Grandpa assignment for CCSS ELA.L.4.1f would be excellent before teaching fourth grade students about sentences, where students are required to produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons

Short-Cycle Assessment

While the students are transitioning or packing up,  they can complete another short standard-specific assessment.  It’s like an exit slip without all the paper, and the data is right there to begin planning for the next class.  Many Edcite assignments are short and require just a few minutes.

To illustrate this, here’s what was created to review Commas.  This quick assignment specifically targets one standard, CCSS ELA.L.5.2c, which asks students to use a comma to set off the words yes and no, to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence, and to indicate direct address.

An assignment with just one or two questions can be used at the end of a lesson. See this Simile or Metaphor assignment, which quickly assesses mastery of CCSS ELA.L.5.5a, where students are asked to interpret figurative language.

Medium-Cycle Assessment

Standard-specific assignment or assignments that combine multiple standards can be used for medium-cycle assessments. For example, if  CCSS ELA.L.3.1g on comparative and superlative adjectives has been taught to third grade students, the My Dog Bruno assignment can be used to identify student strengths and needs.

Alternatively, assignments that address multiple standards at once at the end of a unit can be used. For example, the Dear Aunt Tina assignment about friendly letters reinforces multiple skills based on CCSS ELA.L.2.2.

Whichever we choose, we’re making  positive, research-based steps toward student mastery!

KimBennettKimberly Bennett is an educator experienced in both brick-and-mortar and virtual school settings.  She teaches Korean students and others throughout the world.  She has taught various grades and subjects in the urban public schools of Memphis and Jackson, Tennessee.  She is passionate about education and reforming the way American students learn every day. She works for Edcite, Englishunt, and does freelance work for other clients.  She enjoys spending time with her family, which includes 2 children, 4 dogs and 2 cats.  Just a few more animals, and she’ll be ready to open the zoo that she calls home!

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