Top 10 Question Types in 2017 (Teacher Tools)

Edcite offers 60 technology-enhanced question types that align with online state assessments such as SBAC (Smarter Balanced), PARCC, AIR, ACT Aspire, and FSA (Florida State Assessments). Teachers can use these question types to create their own formative and summative assessments. This year we also improved our question type designs to make it even easier to create questions on Edcite.

Read on for the top 10 Edcite question types teachers used in 2017!

1. Free Response

Free Response was our most popular question type this year! Our Free Response question can be used across subjects, and teachers are able to add digital rubrics to make grading easy. You will find this question listed as #101 on our Create Question page.

Free Response

2. Fill in the Blanks

Teachers love our Fill in the Blanks question type, which is found on online state assessments. You can differentiate this question type by setting it as a drop-down, drag and drop, or type in answer. All options will be autograded. You will find this question listed as #002 on our Create Question page.

Fill in the Blank Drop-Down 2

fill-in-the-blank drag and drop

3. Math Keypad

This question type is always a popular one for math teachers looking for state assessment alignment. It is also autograded! You will find this question listed as #062 (Multiple Answers) or #063 (Single Answer) on our Create Question page.

Student is entering the sum of the fractions using a math keyboard technology-enhanced question type.

4. Essay Response

Teachers can add multiple passages, videos, or audio clips to Essay Response questions. Digital rubrics can also be added for fast grading on Edcite, and teachers can incorporate annotations and comments for students to see on their grade report. You will find this question listed as #100 on our Create Question page.

Essay Response

5. Numeric Answer

The Numeric Answer question type asks students to enter their answer in the box, with the option to write in units. Answers will be automatically graded! You will find this question listed as #066 on our Create Question page. Edcite also offers a Randomized Numeric Response Question (#068). Teachers choose a variable, set a range for it, and then set the answer algebraically so that the question will grade automatically, even though all students will see a different problem.

Need a text version of this question? Check out Edcite’s Short Text Answer question type (#027), which is also autograded!

numeric answer - response

6. Drag and Drop – Text / Drag and Drop – Math

The Drag and Drop – Text question is engaging for students and gives teachers a lot of freedom in how they want to set up the question. Images and tables can be embedded, making it a valuable question to use across subjects. It is also an autograded question type. You will find this question listed as #021 on our Create Question page.
drag and drop

The Drag and Drop – Math question type is very popular because it aligns with online state assessments. Students can drag integers, expressions, images, or text. Teachers can also select an optional grid layout or background image. This autograded drag and drop question is listed as #022 on our Create Question page.

Math Drag and Drop Example.gif

7. Grouping Drag and Drop

Teachers and students love this question type, and it can be used across all levels and subjects. Teachers have the ability to set up answer choices as text or images. This is an autograded question type. You will find it listed as #041 on our Create Question page.

Drag into Categories - Amendments

8. Select Box Response

This multiple choice question type uses larger boxes for answer choices. Teachers can set multiple correct answers and include images or graphs as answers. This autograded question type is listed as #004 on our Create Question page.

American Government - civics practice - multi-select

9. Match Text-to-Text

Students have a lot of fun with this question type as they show their learning! Students match items from two lists, and Edcite autogrades their answers. You will find this question type listed as #041 on our Create Question page.

matching text to text

10. Tabular Checkbox Answer

This question type appears on many online state assessments. Teachers can set up the table with multiple questions or problems and answers. You will find this autograded question listed as #010 on our Create Question page.

Elementary Math Tabular Choice

 

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What is your favorite question type on Edcite? Share on social media with the tag #EdciteQuestionType!

Top 10 Assignments in November (Teacher Resources)

Image is a green background with light wood table; blue and yellow eyeglasses on table in front of orange, yellow, blue, and red books; green apple; tablet; Edcite logo in white, orange, green; 'Most Popular Assignments' written on green background; 'November 2017' written on tablet

In November, students submitted almost 300,000 assignments! Listed below are the top ten assignments (click on the assignment name to view them). You can make a copy of any of these assignments and customize them to fit the needs of your students.

1. Nonfiction Article: The Kudzu Plant: 1050 submissions

Student is selecting the correct meaning of the word in an informational text.

 

2. American Government: Basic Principles of the Constitution: 1015 submissions

basic principles of constitution - grouping.gif

 

3. 7th CFA Expressions and Equations 2017-2018: 744 submissions

simplify math expression - math keyboard.gif

 

4. 6th Grade 2017 FALL AIR Readiness Assessment: 741 submissions

AIR math practice - candies - array.gif

 

5. Grade 3 Fable: The Lion and The Mouse: 724 submission

lion and mouse

 

6. American Government: Civic Participation and Skills: 712 submissions

American Government - civics practice - multi-select.gif

 

7. 4th Grade 2017 Fall AIR Readiness Assessment: 655 submissions

4th Grade AIR Math - reorder.gif

 

8. Figurative Language Practice – RL.6.4, L.6.5: 646 submissions

figurative language assignment

 

9. Nonfiction – Overcoming Adversity – Paired Texts: 480 submissions

drag into groups - categories

 

10. GW Regions: 432 submissions

geography - drag into groups - categories.gif

 

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Do you have a great assignment that you’d like to share with our community? Share your assignment in our Edcite Assignment Library or share on social media!

Top 10 Assignments in October (Teacher Resources)

Image is a green background with light wood table; blue and yellow eyeglasses on table in front of orange, yellow, blue, and red books; green apple; tablet; Edcite logo in white, orange, green; 'Most Popular Assignments' written on green background; 'October 2017' written on tablet

In October, students submitted over 300,000 assignments. That’s an increase from the 176,000 submitted in September! Listed below are the ten assignments with the most submissions in October. Click on the assignment name to view them. You can make a copy of any of these assignments and customize them to fit the needs of your students.

1. Grade 3 Fable: The Lion and The Mouse: 1035 submissionsStudent is highlighting the paragraph which supports the question in the plot using a technology-enhanced question type.

 

2. 6th Grade FWCS Quarter 1 Assessment: 1012 submissions

Student is dragging and dropping the character trait using a technology-enhanced question type.

 

3. Sam – Characters, Literal Comprehension, and Text Evidence: 1000 submissions

Student is dragging and dropping events in the plot using a technology-enhanced question type.

 

4. Nonfiction Article – The Kudzu Plant: 920 submissions

Student is selecting the correct meaning of the word in an informational text.

 

5. 7th Grade FWCS Quarter 1 Assessment: 880 submissions

Student is dragging and dropping character's point of view using a technology-enhanced question type.

 

6. Unit 3 Review: 860 submissionsStudent is entering the sum of the fractions using a math keyboard technology-enhanced question type.

 

7. Geography Skills: 690 submissions

Student is typing the name of the continent, Africa, on a world map.

 

8. Timelines: 670 submissions

Student is dragging historical events into the correct order of a timeline using a technology-enhanced question type.

 

9. Too Much Soda – ELA.RI.5.2 – ELA.RI.4.2: 600 submissions

Student is highlighting the sentence that supports the answer to the question using a technology-enhanced question type.

 

10. Industrialization and Progressivism: 525 submissions

Student is dragging and dropping answer into a table using a technology-enhanced question type.

 

share-buttonDo you have a great assignment that you’d like to share with our community? Share your assignment in our Edcite Assignment Library or share on social media!

Top 10 Assignments in September (Teacher Resources)

Image is a green background with light wood table; blue and yellow eyeglasses on table in front of orange, yellow, blue, and red books; green apple; tablet; Edcite logo in white, orange, green; 'Most Popular Assignments' written on green background; 'September2017' written on tablet

In September students submitted over 176,000 completed assignments on Edcite! Read on for the ten assignments with the most submissions in September. Click on the assignment name to view them. You can make a copy of any of these assignments and customize them to fit the needs of your class.

1. Nonfiction Article – The Kudzu Plant: 1000 submissions

kudzu plant

 

2. Grade 3 Fable: The Lion and The Mouse: 660 submissions

lion and mouse

 

3. 3rd Grade Unit 1 Formative RL.3: 600 submissions

sdale grade 3 formative

 

4. Too Much Soda – ELA.RI.5.2 – ELA.RI.4.2: 580 submissions

too much soda

 

5. Sam – Characters, Literal Comprehension, and Text Evidence: 540 submissions

sam - characters

 

6. Geo Test #2: 515 submissions

geo assignment

 

7. 7th CFA Number System 2017-2018: 400 submissions

7th cfa number system

 

8. Timelines: 380 submissions

Timelines

 

9. 5 Themes of Geography and Map Skills: 340 submissions

themes of maps

 

10. 4th Grade Unit 1 Formative RL.3: 340 submissions

sdale grade 4 formative

 

11. 🎃 Halloween Bonus assignment The Tell-Tale Heart Part 1: 340 submissions

tell-tale heart.gif

 

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Do you have a great assignment that you’d like to share with our community? Share your assignment in our Edcite Assignment Library or share on social media!

Nothing Surprises Me Anymore

KatherineSmith2

 

Nothing surprises me anymore.

Pushing the limits has been a theme at Katherine Smith since our reinvention back just over two years ago. We have been committed to bringing the most innovative learning experience to our students. Using project-based learning and a “No Excuses” attitude, we want our students involved in meaningful learning experience while developing the skills to be successful in an ever-changing world.

KatherineSmith
The Edcite team touring Katherine Smith Elementary

Over the past year, we hosted over three hundred visitors from across the globe, but one tour led to a unique and innovative opportunity for our students. When the Edcite team came, their observations and feedback were the same as so many others; everyone comments on the high quality work and high level of student engagement. For Edcite, they saw something different–an opportunity.

Somewhat of a perfect combination of events led to a first of its kind elementary internship.

As a project-based learning school, it’s extremely important to keep teaching and learning relevant. Our best projects are where the students are contributing to the solution of a real problem. We often bring in experts like guest speakers or industry professionals to support our projects with feedback and expertise from the field. For example, a 6th grade coding project brought computer programmers from Microsoft and EA Sports or a stray animal project called for a veterinarian to speak to kindergartners. For a while, I thought that was what “internship” looked like for an elementary school.  Instead of sending students to the workplace, the workplace came to the students. It was through a professional development opportunity where that began to change. A few of us were doing some online work, and one of the week’s topics was internship. Like so many programs, they were talking about junior and senior level high school students. Hearing the firsthand accounts from them to get to do real projects for real companies made me want to figure out how to get that for our elementary students. Bringing in experts was just not enough.

At about the same time, one of our teachers met the Edcite team and after touring the campus, we began meeting about a potential partnership. The idea of an elementary internship was born. Giving our students the chance to use their skills to do real work for a real company was first and foremost the greatest draw. There was also incredible appeal to work with the Edcite team because both of our organizations shared an idealist vision to make the world a better place.

photo (14)
Jose, Oscar, and Kacie interview for the internship position.

I’ve always said, stress can be a good thing if it has a positive outlet. The entire process has supported that. From the beginning when we asked eight to eleven year olds to apply for a job, or when we put students in front of a panel of adults for an interview, or when we asked them to do real work for a real company, our students have felt real stress, and they have felt real success.

Again, nothing surprises me anymore. I’ve grown to accept I don’t truly know the limit of our students’ potential. But what I do know is to provide them the opportunity, and they will rise to the challenge.

We at Katherine Smith School are incredibly grateful for our partnership with Edcite. It has been and will continue to be a pleasure to work with such caring and thoughtful risk-takers.


aaronAaron Brengard (@brengard) is the principal of Katherine Smith School, a public, neighborhood, elementary school in the Evergreen School District in San Jose, California. Katherine Smith is a New Tech Network School, a No Excuses University School, and a partner with Buck Institute for Education. In his fifteen years in teaching and administration, Brengard has been a strong advocate for bringing innovative learning approaches to underserved populations.

10 Essentials to Using Design Thinking in the Elementary Classroom

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This summer I was given an opportunity to collaboratively design an internship that allowed elementary students to use design thinking. With goals to have our Junior CEOs think critically, collaborate, communicate, and produce creative ideas for Edcite, I knew we had to practice innovation through project-based learning (PBL).  Along with PBL, I’ve had to adopt the design thinking mindset, experimenting with new procedures and remaining open to the ideas of these young minds.  The Junior CEO internship has been a great teaching experience and a valuable learning experience for our students and myself.  You too can bring innovation and empowerment to your classroom with these 10 elements of design thinking.

1. Expectations:photo (12)

Design thinking is human centered, optimistic, experimental, and collaborative.

When presenting design thinking to elementary aged students I found it very important to define our expectations as design thinkers.   We all agreed that an ideal intern would be: (1) collaborative (2) optimistic and positive (we use “I likes” and “I wonders” to provide feedback) (3) experimental and celebrate both successes and failures (4) imaginative and (5) practice empathy.

2. Passion:

Spark passion with an exciting entry event.  Gain interest from your students by having an expert speak about an element of your project.

We began our internship with the founders and members of Edcite speaking at a school wide assembly.  They announced that they were seeking 15 student interns with strengths in the 21st century skills. The idea of having a job and working for an actual company sparked the interest of over 50 applicants in grades 3rd-5th.

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3. Driving Question:photo (13)

A driving question sets a project’s purpose, fuels inquiry and lays down the first steps to help complete the final product. Student curiosity will then lead to a set of questions that students dive into before designing.

The driving question presented to our interns on the first day was, “Using design thinking, how can we help Edcite become a better website for students and teachers?”

The Need to Knows that emerged in the beginning stages of Junior CEOs included: (1) what is Edcite and what do they do? (2) what is “Design Thinking? (2) what do kids want from Edcite? (4) What do teachers want from Edcite? (5) How can we improve Edcite?

 4. In-depth Inquiry:

Guide students to continue developing questions, make connections, use resources and develop answers.

Our investigation began with a summer assignment, where students listed their favorite ipad apps or games and the reasons they enjoyed them.  The interns researched Edcite’s motto: empowering teachers, engaging students. The process of investigation lead to a mind map with various ways to make Edcite more engaging for students.

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5. Engage With Experts:

Develop partnerships with local businesses, or outside professionals who can showcase their career and provide some insight or help with your project.

IMG_0865Partnering up with Edcite provided many opportunities to learn about the many roles in running a software company.  Co-founder Amar Rajasekhar came into to speak to the kids about the start-up of Edcite and his role as a CEO in their U.S. office.  Software engineer, Tony Thomas paid the interns a visit, providing feedback to the students on their prototypes and presented about having a career in engineering.

One of the most memorable and personal experiences was the student’s connection with the Edcite staff in India. Mr. Rajasekhar showcased pictures of the facilities in Banglagore and the staff hard at work.  Junior CEO, Valentina wrote  “I feel really proud that people in India actually read our blogs and use our ideas. I think it is incredible and awesome. I really love that you guys use some of our ideas from our blogs to put into Edcite. I also enjoy that you are making Edcite better for people all over the world.”

IMG_06616. Build Empathy:

Provide opportunities for students to identify the challenge and discover the details of the problem. Provide them with strategies to reflect on the needs  and wants of others.

In order to build prototypes to teach the alphabet, the interns spent  time with 5 year olds on the playground, interviewing and discovering their behaviors. Before designing their ABC prototypes, Junior CEO’s produced a design statement using the frame: ________________(noun) needs ____________________________________ in a way that _______________________________. This statement helped the interns practice empathy and to think about needs of others throughout the design phase.IMG_0847

7. Critique, Reflection and Revision:

Provide many opportunities to give and receive feedback that is specific, helpful and kind.  Next, allow students to reflect on feedback in order to carry out their revision.

Critical friends is a protocol of project based learning that is familiar to the Junior CEOs.  We received feedback from students in different grades as well as teachers in efforts to build prototypes that were engaging to all students.

The Junior CEOs blogged about their internship experience everyday.  As part of this reflection, the interns looked to their feedback and made a list of revisions they would use on their prototype.IMG_0866

8. Encourage Creativity, Voice and Choice:

Students are given some freedom to the design and creation of their prototype.

The interns chose which element of engagement that they would like to create a prototype for.  Many design tools were introduced to the interns including applications, for drawing, presenting, developing games, and moving making.  Junior CEOs were given voice and choice on how to design and present their prototypesIMG_0636.

 

9. Collaboration: 

With respect, compromise, and the sharing of individual strengths, students can do more when they work together.

The interns were a great mix of students in both grade and skill levels. The individual talents and strengths continually complimented one another throughout the design thinking process. Through challenges and achievements, I encouraged the interns to respect and appreciate each other’s differences.  When we gathered every morning and huddled together before dismissal, the Junior CEOs understood that they were unified in making Edcite better for students.

10. Public Audience:

Allow students to rise to the occasion,  presenting their work beyond their classmates and teacher.

Junior CEOs collaborative presentation included a prototype pitch to Edcite.  Edcite staff listened to each presentation, giving feedback and presenting questions.  Parents and members of the community listened as the interns practiced their communication skills.

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IMG_0681
Ms. Melo (center) and the Junior CEOs celebrating birthdays and the end of a successful first week of the internship.

Sheryl Melo has been teaching for 11 years — 10 of which have been at Katherine Smith Elementary School in San Jose, CA. Mrs. Melo currently teaches 5th grade. She is on the Katherine Smith School Tech Team, a team that helps integrate more education technology. As Mrs. Melo says, “I get really pumped about technology that help me bridge the differences and challenges among my students.  I love tools and applications that  allows my students to  embrace their strengths and creativity.  I appreciate how technology gives us a platform to teach, connect, contribute, and make this world a better place.”